Lung Art

Make lung art using your lungs!

This activity is a modification of the activity found in our workbook, About Me.

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You will need:

  1. Washable paints
  2. Lungs printable
  3. Straw
  4. Small containers
  5. Paint brushes
  6. White card stock

What to do:

  1. Print out our lungs printable (look in Lesson 11, Body Outline) onto a white piece of card stock.
  2. Dilute washable paints with water in some small containers. The paint should be very runny.
  3. Drip some paint drops onto the trachea ends in the lungs printable.DSC_6937
  4. With a straw, blow onto the paint drops so they run and branch out. The harder you blow, the farther your paint will go.

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The “branches” in your lungs are called bronchi, and they are passageways for air to travel into the lungs.

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Check out the complete Lungs lesson plan in our workbook, About Me!

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All New Workbook!

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Science experiments! Cool crafts! Coloring pages! My World is a child’s introduction to the exciting study of the physical world and how it works. Included are 17 lessons, 70+ activities, 32 worksheets, and 100+ stickers!

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Lessons include:

  1. Sequences
  2. Forces
  3. Heavy & Light
  4. Energy
  5. Gas, Liquid, Solid
  6. Air
  7. Water
  8. Light
  9. Color
  10. Hot and Cold
  11. Weather
  12. Shapes
  13. Life
  14. Growing Up
  15. Layers
  16. Cycles
  17. Sound

Craft and activity supplies are common and inexpensive:

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My World follows the same creative, colorful, and child-friendly format as About Me. Your child will love having his very own workbook and will look forward to science time with you!

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Free Anatomy Printables

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Use the following printables to accompany the body lessons found in About Me, a science workbook designed for small children.

 

Play Dough Anatomy Mat

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Use our free Anatomy Mat to make and position play dough organs! (comes in color and b&w)

  1. Print out the mat.
  2. If you want to re-use the mat, place it in a page protector or laminate it. Otherwise, tape it to a table.
  3. Break out the play dough and let your child have at it. You may want to provide an anatomy diagram (like the one below) for her to look at.
  4. Discuss the functions of the organs as your child creates them.

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Free Anatomy Poster Diagram

Our free Anatomy Poster comes in 2 sizes: 8.5×11″ and 17×22″. Hang it on the wall during your human body unit!

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About Me Is the perfect workbook to introduce your young child to human anatomy. Filled with fun crafts, activity ideas, stickers, and worksheets, your child will be excited to learn about her body and how it works!

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The Pumping Heart

This activity is a quick way to demonstrate how the heart pumps blood through blood vessels. Do it with our Circulation Outline activity, and then add it to your hand project from our workbook, About Me:

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All you need is a straw and a red pipe cleaner. A clear straw is preferred (found on amazon) because blood vessels are translucent, but you can also use a pink straw.

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Show your child a picture of a heart. Tell him that it’s about the size of his fist.

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Pretend with your child that your fists are hearts that are pumping. Practice squeezing your fists while mimicking the heartbeat rhythm, pa-pum pa-pum pa-pum.

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Now have your child hold the end of the pipe cleaner with his heart-fist and push it through the blood vessel (straw) while pumping. If possible, have him push only when he pumps. This takes some coordination, so he might need assistance.

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Why We Like It:

This activity teaches:

  1. The size of the heart and what it looks like
  2. How the heart pumps
  3. Blood vessels are tubes
  4. Blood does not continuously flow through the vessels, but moves with the beat of the heart

Kids enjoy “threading” the pipe cleaner through a straw (a fine motor skill) and watching as the straw turns from clear to red.

Extend the Activity: Make 5 of these vessels filled with blood and add them to your hand project from Lesson 9 in our workbook, About Me.

Lesson 9, Heart & Vessels, from About Me. Includes activity ideas, stickers, and worksheets!

Lesson 9, Heart & Vessels, from About Me. Includes activity ideas, stickers, and worksheets!

 

Spice it Up!

The following activity was inspired by Lesson 3 in our workbook, About Me. .

Check out Lesson 3, Five Senses, in our workbook, About Me!

 

This Christmas-themed activity is a perfect addition to your unit on the 5 senses, and it’s super easy to prepare!

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What you need:

  1. Italian Seasonings
  2. Cinnamon
  3. Rosemary or pine needles
  4. Ground cloves or ground ginger
  5. Glue
  6. Free Printable (print onto card stock if possible) spice art

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What to do:

  1. Have your child explore his sense of smell by smelling different spices from your cupboard. Have him describe to you what each smells like, or reminds him of.
  2. Narrow the spices down to the four listed above and show your child the worksheet. Using his sense of smell, have him match the spice to the correct picture.
  3. Apply glue to a picture and sprinkle the correct spice onto it. Repeat with the remaining pictures.

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Why we like it:

This activity not only exposes your child to different smells, but also has him identify where he has smelled those smells in everyday life. He learns about how spices affect our senses, through taste and smell. Your child can come back to this project and experience it repeatedly throughout the week!

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Check out Lesson 3, Five Senses, in our workbook, About Me

Muscle Mania!

The following activities were inspired by Lesson 8 in our workbook, About Me.

The following activities were inspired by Lesson 8 in our workbook, About Me.

Play the following game with your child and teach him about the different muscle groups in his body.

Muscle Mania:

We made 6 cards using free clip art of various body parts. You can download here:

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Print the cards out onto heavy card stock. Cut out and turn them face-down in a pile.

Have your child draw the top card, then roll a die.

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Ask your child to find the corresponding body part on his body. Show him where his muscles are in that body part and have him feel them.

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Feeling the hand muscles

Ask your child if he can think of an activity, action, or exercise using those muscles. Have him do an action with those muscles the number of times he rolled on the die. See if he can feel his muscles flexing as he does the action.

Power Punch!

Power Punch!

  1. Legs – bending up & down, jumping, kicking, skipping, walking, running
  2. Arms – lifting, pulling, reaching, punching, waving, hugging, washing, high fives
  3. Hands – squeezing, touching, patting, scratching, writing
  4. Feet – stretch the toes, lift up on tip-toes, tap foot
  5. Neck – shake head, nod head, chicken neck action, turn head side to side
  6. Stomach – sit ups, laughing, body twist

Repeat with the rest of the cards.

Why We Like It:

This fun activity makes your child more aware of his muscles and how they work by observing and feeling them. It also encourages your child think about which muscles he uses for common everyday activities.

Clean Hands, Healthy You

The following activities were inspired by Lesson 16 in our workbook, About Me.

The following activities were inspired by Lesson 17 in our workbook, About Me.

Good hygiene starts with clean hands – teach your child about the importance of hand washing with this week’s activities:

Activity #1 – Invisible Dirt

This activity is most effective in the middle of the day, after your child has been about playing for a while.

Have your child look at her hands and tell you if they look clean or not. To her naked eye, they probably will.

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Then, with a wet wipe, scrub both of her hands firmly. Together, look closely at the wet wipe for smudges of dirt.

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Why We Like It: Your child will be surprised to see that her hands weren’t so clean after all!

 

Activity #2 – Invisible Germs

Activity #1 is a good lead-in to this activity. Your child has learned that she can’t always see the dirt and germs on her hands. Show her some pictures of germs, like the following, and explain that the germs on her hands are too small to see.

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She can color this fun Germs Coloring Page (found on our website under “Support Materials”), then trace her hand-print around the germs:

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Why We Like It: This activity reinforces the concept that hands are one of the germ-iest places on the body.

 

Activity #3 – Dirty Food

For the next activity, you will need some flour and some finger foods. Tell your child to pretend that the flour is dirt and germs. Have her get her fingers “dirty” in the flour.

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Now, present your child with the food and have her pick it up. Strawberries work really well:

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Why We Like It: Your child will see how dirt and germs get on the food she eats if she doesn’t wash her hands. She will definitely want you to wash it off before she eats it!

 

Activity #4 – Good, Clean Fun

This craft is an extension of the personalized soap dispenser craft found in our workbook, About Me. It’s easy and helps motivate your child to wash her hands.

You will need a soap dispenser with clear soap and a small toy.

Remove the labels from the soap dispenser (*warning: cheaper dispensers have tougher, stickier labels). Twist off the nozzle and push the toy inside. (Small, rubbery toys work best.) Replace the nozzle.

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You could also use cute beads for a future necklace or bracelet craft.

Now, get those hands clean! Hand washing should last for 15 seconds.

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Why We Like It: Your child will want to wash her hands frequently in order to earn the prize when the dispenser is empty. This activity is also a good opportunity for your child to practice her counting!

These activities are great supplements to our Health lesson from About Me – a fun and educational workbook for kids!

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Lesson 17, Health, from About Me.

Sounds Like Fun!

This activity goes along with Lesson 3 in our workbook, About Me.

This activity goes along with Lesson 3 in our workbook, About Me.

Here is a  listening game that is loads of fun – your child will want to play it over and over again!

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You’ll need the following supplies:

  1. Popcorn seeds
  2. Marbles
  3. Raisins
  4. Rice
  5. Coins
  6. Toothpicks
  7. Pebbles
  8. Raw shell pasta
  9. Oat Cereal

First, download our Matching Sounds Mat (found under “Support Materials”) and print out. We put ours in a page protector, for obvious reasons.

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Fill 9 plastic Easter eggs with the supplies. This game is trickier if the eggs are all the same color.

Ask your child to heft, shake, and listen to each egg. He can guess what’s in them by placing each on it’s corresponding square on the mat.

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When he is done guessing, your child can open each egg to see if he’s correct. It’s pretty cool to see him light up when he gets it right!

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Why We Like It: This is another version of our Eggsamples activity, which isolates and explores several of the five senses. Kids like the colorful mat and the opportunity to “guess” by placing eggs on the squares. They excitedly anticipate the completion of the game, when they get to see how many eggs they guessed correctly. This is a good introduction to the process of elimination and is not as easy as it looks – it might take your child a few practices to get them all right!

Check out the Five Senses lesson in our workbook, About Me!

Check out the Five Senses lesson in our workbook, About Me!

Feeling Hands

This post was inspired by Lesson 3 in our workbook About Me.

Filled with fun activities, colorful illustrations, and inventive worksheets, About Me will excite your child to learn about the human body!

This week’s sensory project can be developed in many different ways. Come up with your own ideas!

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Project #1 – Hand Cut-outs

1. Gather a variety of papers and materials that have an interesting feel. We chose corrugated cardboard, faux fur, foam, sparkly card stock, felt, and metallic scrapbooking paper.

2. Trace around your child’s hand onto card stock to make a template. (Reserve this template if you choose to complete project #3.) Use the template to trace the hand onto your papers and fabrics. Cut out each.

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3. If you wish, this can be as far as you go with this project. You can punch a hole in each hand and string them together, or use a key ring to keep them attached. Your child will want to handle them as she learns words to describe how each feels.

 

Project #2 – Texture Cards

1. Write or type a describing word for each hand on pieces of card stock. Cut the card stock into smaller cards for easier handling. Glue the hands onto their corresponding cards.

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The foam hand feels soft and squishy

 

Project #3 – Feeling Hands Book

1. To make a book, you will need a small cardboard box, such as one for cereal/granola bars. Cut the box to resemble a cover. Make sure you have cut the cover the same size as your hand cards.

2. Decorate the book cover – we used the reserved hand template for the front and covered the back with construction paper (using school glue).

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3. Punch holes in the spine and on the cards, making sure they are aligned, like this:

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3. Thread a piece of yarn or string through the holes and secure with a square knot:

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Optional – we “laminated” our book cover with packaging tape to make it sturdier.

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Why We Like It:  This is a cute project that your child can enjoy for quite a while. She learns that her hands are what she uses most when discovering what objects feel like. If you use bright and colorful materials, this project can be a highly visual experience as well. Teach your child new describing words while she feels each cut-out.

Lesson 3: Five Senses - includes activities, games, and worksheets!

Lesson 3: Five Senses – includes activities, games, and worksheets!

Your Hair is Fabulous!

This week's activity were inspired by Lesson 5 in our workbook About Me.

This week’s activities were inspired by Lesson 5 in our workbook About Me.

Hair doesn’t seem to have any apparent purpose, especially to young children. Here are some basic, important facts about hair that they can learn:

1. Hair is not alive. This is why it does not hurt to cut your hair. However, the root of the hair (in the follicle) IS alive, so it does hurt to pull your hair.

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2. Hair provides warmth. For a polar bear, this is very important. For us, not so much. We put on clothes to stay warm. But try this: blow on someone’s arm, then on their head. Which one feels colder? The hairier you are, the warmer you will be.

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3. Hair protects us. The hair in our noses, ears, and eyebrows (see post) keeps germs and other objects from getting into our bodies. Take a look at this photo:

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This is a super close-up picture of a nose hair with mucous, pollen, and dead skin on it.

It reminded us of a household dust brush. Look at all the junk stuck to it!

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4. Hair grows everywhere on the outside of your body, EXCEPT for the soles of your feet, the palms of your hands, and your lips. With good lighting, look very closely at the parts of your body where you think you have no hair – you will see that it’s there!

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Some Hairy Activities Using…

1. Pipe Cleaners! – this hairy crafting material can show kids how hair catches dirt and dust. Pipe cleaners were originally used to clean out residue from tobacco pipes.

Cleaning a Pipe

We used pipe cleaners to decorate the Hair Worksheet from our workbook About Me. You can make it curly, straight, short, or long (you can cut pipe cleaners with scissors). We attached the hair onto the heads with two-sided tape.

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Why we like it: Pipe cleaners have some resemblance to real hair and can demonstrate hair’s ability to capture unwanted bodily invaders. Children will be creative in coming up with their own hair styles.

 

2. Construction Paper – This activity is just for fun. You can make an easy “wig” out of construction paper.

Cut 15-20 long strips of paper. Cut a couple of strips wider than the rest (for the headband). You will need to tape these wide strips together to make one long band that will fit all the way around your child’s head. Using two-sided tape, attach the rest of the strips all along the circumference of the headband, leaving a gap for your child’s face.

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Gorgeous!