Breakfast Beginnings

This week’s activities were inspired by Lesson 12 from About Me.

 

Project #1 – Yogurt by You

Making yogurt is pretty easy – all it requires is some time. You need just three things:

1/2 gallon of whole milk, 1/2 cup of plain yogurt (with active cultures) and a cooking thermometer.

We followed a recipe found on the kitchn, and we suggest you do the same for more detailed instructions.

First, heat up the milk to just before boiling in a heavy pot. Take turns stirring constantly. This changes the protein structure of the milk.
Cool the milk to warm. In a separate bowl, whisk one cup of the warm milk with 1/2 cup of yogurt. The yogurt contains bacteria needed to make your milk nice and thick.

Pour this mixture back into the pot. Put a lid on the pot and keep it warm for 4 hours. We left ours in an oven with the light on.

After 4 hours, your yogurt should have thickened with some clumps. Stir, then cool in the refrigerator.

Why We Like It: This is an easy, healthy activity in which your kids can actually witness the transformation of milk into a much-loved dairy product. Add flavors and toppings!

 

Project #2 – Grains for Brains

While you wait for the yogurt to set up, work on this fun craft:

Breakfast cereals come in so many colors and shapes that it’s hard to tell what they’re made of. This activity will help children understand what it is they’re eating for breakfast.

You will need:

  1. Grains to Cereal worksheet (Lesson 15) printed onto card stock
  2. White card stock
  3. School glue
  4. Markers
  5. Rice
  6. Oatmeal
  7. Wheat kernels – found in most bulk sections of the supermarket
  8. Popcorn kernels
  9. Rice cereal
  10. Oat cereal
  11. Wheat cereal
  12. Corn cereal
  13. 8 small bowls

Grains are seeds that come from grass plants.


corn rice
oats wheat


Present your child with bowls of grains and cereals and see if he can match which comes from which.

Next, have your child draw a generic grass stalk in each large rectangle on the worksheet:

Grain seeds are picked and processed (usually ground) before they are made into foods.

Your child can glue the different types of seeds on each stalk:
He can now glue the corresponding cereal into the bowls directly beneath. (He might have fun coloring the bowls, too):

Why We Like It: 

  1. Because they are using actual seeds and foods, kids will understand what cereals are made of. 
  2. They have fun feeling the different grains and sneaking bits of cereal here and there!
  3. You can take the opportunity to teach them how grains are processed while they complete the craft.
  4. This activity can also be modified to include breads and/or crackers.

Check out the activities and worksheets about grains in our first workbook, About Me. Have fun!


 


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